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Tools for Online Teaching

3-2-1 Reflection

What is it

The 3-2-1 Reflection is a brief questionnaire that asks students to identify three things they did not know before class, two things you find interesting and will investigate further or share with another person, and one thing that will change in your personal life or professional practice due to the information learned during the module.

In order to reflect and document the learning progress on each topic, at the end of each live class, give students a few minutes to develop a 3-2-1 reflection. Using class time to reflect on the material that has been covered in class helps make information more relevant for each student, thus improving their learning process.

Why do it (Benefits)

Using 3-2-1 Reflections may:

  • Help personalize learning
  • Help improve memory (and, consequently, learning)
  • May class topics more personally relevant

How to do it

  1. Include a slide in your slide deck with the 3-2-1 Reflection prompt. Alternatively, you can have a Word document or similar setup to share with your students so they can read the instructions for the reflection.
  2. Take time at the end of every live class (five to 10 minutes are enough) to show your students the prompt and ask them to quietly jot down their notes.
  3. Provide students with prompt, descriptive and specific feedback. We recommend grading the 3-2-1 Reflections within the first one to two days after class. By grading this assignment in this short time frame, not only do students receive prompt feedback, but the class is also fresh in your mind, which facilitates grading. So that students may take corrective actions before submitting their next 3-2-1 Reflection, they should receive your feedback with enough time to review it before the next submission.
  4. Be sure to attach the rubric to the 3-2-1 Reflection in the online classroom.

We recommend using the following prompt as a model for your own 3-2-1 Reflection:

3-2-1 Reflection

In the last few minutes of class, you will be asked to come to this area and post in brief (six to ten sentences):

  • Three things you didn’t know before class
  • Two things you are going to share with someone else or continue to research because they are so interesting
  • One thing you will change in your personal life or professional practice because of the information learned this week

If there are any loose ends or pending questions, please post them on the Content Questions discussion board.

Review the rubric for details on how this assignment will be graded.

We also recommend using the following rubric as a model for your own 3-2-1 Reflection rubric. Depending on your objectives, your students, and other factors, you can adapt this rubric as you see fit:

3-2-1: Three things you didn’t know before class Complete

Three thoughtful points listed

30 points

Partially Complete

Some points listed

15 points

Incomplete 

Inadequate or no information provided

0 points

3-2-1: Two things to share/research Complete

Two thoughtful points listed

30 points

Partially Complete 

Some points listed

15 points

Incomplete

Inadequate or no information provided

0 points

3-2-1: One thing to change Complete

One thoughtful point listed

30 points

Partially Complete 

Some perspective on possibility of change is presented

15 points

Incomplete

Inadequate or no information provided

0 points

Timeliness On time

10 points

Late

0 points

Announcements

What is it (What to do)

 

Why do it (Benefits)

Using descriptive and specific feedback may:

  • .
Anonymous Feedback Survey

What is it

Anonymous Feedback Surveys are short questionnaires that you can ask students to complete at the end of each module in order to have their feedback about the class. Ask your students if there is anything that can be done to improve the class or if they have any suggestions about the format, methodology, timing, instructions, or any other aspect of the class.

Why do it (Benefits)

Using anonymous feedback surveys may:

  • Provide you with valuable insights into your student’s opinion about the class
  • Provide you with valuable information about your student’s needs
  • Provide you with information in a timely manner
  • Guide you as to corrective actions that you can take to improve your class
  • Help students feel and see that their opinion matters

How to do it

While the format for the survey may vary depending on the Learning Management System that you use for your class, in general, you can follow these steps:

  1. Create a regular “quiz” or “questionnaire” in your online classroom.
  2. Set up the questionnaire so that the responses can remain anonymous.
  3. Set up the questionnaire so that this is an ungraded activity.
  4. Add the questions you wish your students to respond to.
  5. Create the number of copies of the questionnaire that you need, depending on the frequency with which you want your students to complete the survey. For example, you can have a survey per module or week.
  6. Provide the link to the survey in the corresponding module page.
  7. Encourage students to complete the survey at the end of each module. Remind them that the survey is anonymous and let them know that the information they provide in the survey will help you be a better teacher and better adapt the class to their needs.

We recommend using the following questions as a model for your own survey, These questions are set up as open-ended questions:

  1. What worked well in this module?
  2. What didn’t work well in this module?
  3. Did anything surprise you in this module? If so, what?
  4. Is there something else you would like us to know about this module?
Bundles or Mini-Libraries

What are they

Bundles or mini-libraries are online collections that consist of a variety of links to magazine articles, videos, podcasts, websites and other free resources. These libraries have material with different levels of difficulty (beginner, intermediate, advanced) and in different formats (video, indexed article, book and university essay).

Why do it

Using Bundles may:

  • Help you differentiate learning.
  • Give students access to information in their preferred format.
  • Help you meet all students where they are with regard to their learning.
  • Increase student motivation to complete required reading/resource review
  • Enrich class discussions
  • Help you be mindful of students’ budget

How to do it

  1. Create a list of the major topics to be covered in your class
  2. Search online for freely available resources on each course topic, such as websites, videos, podcasts, journal articles, popular press articles, books, book chapters, or any other type of resource you consider pertinent.
  3. Be sure to include sources with different modalities and different complexity levels.
  4. Put all resources for each topic together in a single uploadable document or page in your online classroom. Include the HTML link to all sources so your students can access them easily.
  5. We recommend presenting the sources in the bundle in the citation format that you will be using for your class (e.g., APA, Chicago, MLA) so that you model said format for your students.
  6. The instructions can indicate that students should skim the content of the entire collection and then select one (or two, or three, or more, depending on your objective) to review in detail.
  7. If you wish, you can highlight recommended resources with an asterisk or by highlighting the resource text with the “highlight” or “text background color” available in most word processing programs and Learning Management Systems. We recommend avoiding highlighting the source by changing the color of the text since this will be hard to see for a color-blind person.
  8. We also recommend including in the instructions a short (one to two minutes) video where you explain the purpose of the bundles and guide your students in their use. Alternatively, or additionally, you can provide an audio recording with the same information (for example, if you cannot record a video or if your students have limited internet connectivity)

Following is an example of a bundle on Mind, Brain, Health and Education Science which you can use as a model for your own bundles.

Instructions

Watch the video about bundles.

This bundle was created to edify and support your research interests. Resources that have an asterisk, are recommended by the faculty.

Resources

1. *Ansari, D., König, J., & Tokuhama-Espinosa, T. (2017). Developmental cognitive neuroscience: Implications for teachers’ pedagogical knowledge. Pedagogical knowledge and the changing nature of the teaching profession. OECD.

2. Bolland, S. (2016). Neuroscience, AI and the future of education | Scott Bolland | TEDxSouthBank. [Video file]. Retrieved from https://youtu.be/_cYIvfS-knA

3. *De Smedt, B. (2014). Advances in the use of neuroscience methods in research on learning and instruction. Frontline Learning Research, 2(4), 7-14.

4. Doidge, N. (2007). The brain that changes itself: Stories of personal triumph from the frontiers of brain science. Penguin.

5. *Dubinsky, J. M., Roehrig, G., & Varma, S. (2013). Infusing neuroscience into teacher professional development. Educational Researcher, 42(6), 317-329.

6. *Dundar, S., & Ayvaz, U. (2016). From cognitive to educational neuroscience. International Education Studies, 9(9), 50.

7. Fischer, K. (2011). Mind, Brain, and Education: Analyzing human learning and development. [Video file]. Retrieved from https://youtu.be/zSM0oCStxBw

8. *Fischer, K. W. (2009). Mind, brain, and education: Building a scientific groundwork for learning and teaching. Mind, Brain, and Education, 3(1), 3–16.

9. Fischer, K. W., Daniel, D. B., Immordino-Yang, M. H., Stern, E., Battro, A., & Koizumi, H. (Eds.). (2007). Why mind, brain, and education? Why now?. Mind, Brain, and Education, 1(1), 1–2.

10. *Gardner, H. (2011). Is there such a thing as a brainless education? [Video file]. Retrieved from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BWvfmPSGqhg

11. *Goswami, U. (2006). Neuroscience and education: From research to practice. Nature Reviews Neuroscience, 7(5), 406–413.

12. *Hinton, C., Fischer, K. W., & Glennon, C. (2012). Mind, brain, and education. MIND.

13. Horvath, J. C., & Donoghue, G. M. (2016). A bridge too far–revisited: Reframing Bruer’s neuroeducation argument for modern science of learning practitioners. Frontiers in Psychology, 7, 377.

14. Horvath, J. C., & Lodge, J. M. (2016). A framework for organizing and translating science of learning research. In J.C. Horvath, J. M. Lodge & J. Hattie’s (Eds.). From the laboratory to the classroom: Translating science of learning for teachers, (pp.7-20). Routledge.

15. Immordino-Yang, M.H., & Fischer, K.W. (2011). Neuroscience bases of learning. In V. G. Aukrust (Ed.), Learning and cognition in education. Elsevier.

16. Kalbfleisch, M. L. (2015). Educational neuroscience, constructivism, and the mediation of learning and creativity in the 21st century. Frontiers in Psychology, 6, 133.

17. McCandliss, B. (2015). The neuroscience of learning. [Video file]. Retrieved from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5_6fezBz9IA

18. Newcombe, N. A. (2013). Educating to use evidence in thinking about education. Mind, Brain, and Education, 7(2), 147–150.

19. Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD). (2002). Understanding the brain: towards a new learning science. OECD Publishing.

20. Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD). (2010). Executive summary. The nature of learning: Using research to inspire practice, (pp.13-18). OECD.

21. Pasquinelli, E., Zalla, T., Gvodzic, K., Potier-Watkins, C., & Piazza, M. (2015). Mind, brain, and teaching: Some directions for future research. . Behavioral and Brain Sciences, 38.

22. Tokuhama-Espinosa, T. (2011). A brief history of the science of learning. Part 1. New Horizons in Education. Johns Hopkins School of Education.

23. Tokuhama-Espinosa, T. (2011). A brief history of the science of learning. Part 2. New Horizons in Education. Johns Hopkins School of Education.

24. Tokuhama-Espinosa, T. (2014). Making classrooms better: 50 practical applications of mind, brain, and education science. Introduction, (pp. xxxiii-xli). WW Norton & Company.

25. *Tokuhama-Espinosa, T. (2012). Mind, brain, and education. [Video file]. Retrieved from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-emz2QM_Qk0

26. Tokuhama-Espinosa, T. (2017). Mind brain, and education science: An international Delphi survey 2016-2017. Quito, Ecuador: Author. DOI: 10.13140/RG.2.2.14259.22560.

27. Tokuhama-Espinosa, T. (2018, December 4). Neuromyths: What we know about the learning brain. [Audio podcast episode]. In Research in minutes. Kappan. https://kappanonline.org/podcast-what-we-know-about-learning-brain/

28. Wilson, A. (2013). What if… neuroscience could change education? University of Canterbury. [Video file]. Retrieved from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Q96MnaJyaaA

29. Zadina, J. N. (2015). The emerging role of educational neuroscience in education reform. Psicología Educativa, 21(2), 71-77.

Descriptive and Specific Feedback

What is it (What to do)
Why do it (Benefits)

Using descriptive and specific feedback may:

Discussion Boards

What are they

Discussion Boards are online forums where an individual can post a message about a topic, question, or prompt and have others respond to it. The more common use of discussion boards is as indicators that the students have engaged with the module’s material and can answer a question related to the topic. Additionally, however, they can be used to create personal significance about information explored in class and to create a learning community through dialogue.

For each unit of the module have one or more questions for discussion forums. Ask students to answer prompts based on their personal and professional experiences, as well as the literature in the class. In this way the student will connect their personal life in a practical and relevant way to the materials, concepts, theories, and elements discussed in class.

Ask students to respond to their classmates in a substantive and profound way, and we seek to maintain dialogue and conversations in the forums. In their responses to peers, encourage your students to go beyond simple answers such as «I agree» or «I like your ideas», requiring reflection and investment in the other learners.

Why do it (Benefits)

Using descriptive and specific feedback may:

  • Help students practice writing
  • Personalize learning
  • Help students create connections between class material and their personal and/or professional life
  • Help create a strong learning community

How to do it

Creating discussion boards in your online classroom will vary depending on the Learning Management System that your institution uses (for example, Blackboard, Moodle, Google Classrooms, or Canvas). However, these are some general guidelines you can follow.

  1. Create a provocative prompt for each module in your course.
  2. Create a discussion board for each module.
  3. Provide detailed instructions for the discussion board. In the instructions:
    1. Ask students to write an original answer (200 to 250 words) to the question published in the discussion forum.
    2. In addition, have students read and answer substantially (in 75 to 100 words) to the main responses of at least two other learners.
    3. Indicate to your students that all main responses must be sent no later than midnight of the day before class, so that information can be incorporated into the class. Since early publications generally receive more comments from classmates and instructors, encourage your students to publish as soon as possible.
    4. Also indicate that responses to at least two classmates must be sent no later than one week after class.
    5. Finally, let your students know that forum posts should be substantial, encouraging, constructive and well documented with evidence from course readings and/or reliable external sources.
    6. Provide the rubric for the discussion board.

The following are instructions for a discussion board that include all the information mentioned above. Use these instructions as a model or your own discussion board instructions.

Instructions

Please read carefully:

Write an original comment (200 to 250 words) in response to the message presented above. Base your response on what you have read, seen and discussed in this module, as well as what you have experienced in your personal and/or professional life. Write in a way that motivates your peers to be interested in the topic and respond to your publication.

Be sure to indicate all references to resources that support your thoughts. (References are a list of the sources you have cited in your answer and are at the end of the publication.) You must follow APA format. References DO NOT affect the word count of the comment. The quotes in the text, do.

Video mode: As an alternative, you can record a one minute (maximum) video instead of writing a publication. Keep in mind that, in any case, you will have to list your references (in APA format) in the publication that links to your video.

Read other students’ publications and respond substantively, constructively and with attentiveness to at least two students (75 to 100 words per answer).

Before publishing, check your contributions to avoid spelling and/or grammatical errors!

Review the rubric for details on how you will be scored.

We also recommend using the following rubric as a model for your own Discussion Board rubric. We have found it promotes reflection, personalization, and connections between peers Depending on your objectives, your students, and other factors, you can adapt this rubric as you see fit:

 FOCUS-Original Post: Post is well developed and fully addresses all aspects of given assignment (answers the discussion board question)  INADEQUATE: Makes statements (and/or agrees or disagrees with others) which are out of context or irrelevant.  INCOMPLETE: Makes statements (and/or agrees or disagrees with others) but without evidence to support position.  PARTIALLY COMPLETE: Makes statements (and/or agrees or disagrees with others) and addresses some aspects of the question  COMPLETE: Makes statements (and/or agrees or disagrees with others) and addresses all aspects of the question.
0 points 3 points 6 points 10 points
 COHERENCE: – Original Post: Includes and applies course concepts, theories, or materials; writes clearly.  INADEQUATE: Does not explain relevant course concepts, theories, or materials.  INCOMPLETE: Summarizes some relevant course concepts, theories, or materials.  PARTIALLY COMPLETE: Applies and analyzes most relevant course concepts, theories, or materials correctly.  COMPLETE: Evaluates and synthesizes course concepts, theories, or materials correctly, using examples.
0 points 3 points 6 points 10 points
 CONTEXT-Original Post: Applies relevant professional, personal, or other real-world experiences and extends the dialogue by responding to the examples of peers.  INADEQUATE: Does not contribute professional, personal, or other real-world experiences.  INCOMPLETE: Contributes some professional, personal, or other real-world experiences that may or may not relate to course content.  PARTIALLY COMPLETE: Applies relevant professional, personal, or other real-world experiences.  COMPLETE: Applies relevant professional, personal, or other real-world experiences and/or extends the dialogue by responding to the examples of peers
0 points 3 points 6 points 10 points
 EVIDENCE-Original Post: Supports position beyond assigned reading; clearly articulates and defends beliefs; displays critical thinking and intellectual humility; correctly cites sources.  INADEQUATE: Does not establish relevant position. Does not provide citations.  INCOMPLETE: Establishes relevant position but does minimal outside research. Provides citations some of the time.  PARTIALLY COMPLETE: Consistently supports position with additional resources. Provides citations most of the time  COMPLETE: Validates position with applicable resources and supports the learning of others through the contribution of additional resources. Consistently provides citations
0 points 3 points 6 points 10 points
 TIMELINESS-Original Post  Late  On time
0 points 10 points
  
Peer Reply 1: Responds to fellow learners, relating the discussion to relevant course concepts and providing substantive feedback  INADEQUATE: Does not respond to fellow learners.  INCOMPLETE: Provides some feedback to one other student but superficially (may be too long or too brief).  PARTIALLY COMPLETE: Provides generally substantive, encouraging, and constructive feedback (may be too long or too brief)  COMPLETE: Complete Provides substantive, encouraging, and constructive feedback in 75 to 100 words
0 points 5 points 15 points 20 points
Peer Reply 1: Timeliness  Late  On time
0 points 5 points
Peer Reply 2: Responds to fellow learners, relating the discussion to relevant course concepts and providing substantive feedback.  INADEQUATE: Does not respond to fellow learners.  INCOMPLETE: Provides some feedback to one other student but superficially (may be too long or too brief).  PARTIALLY COMPLETE: Provides generally substantive, encouraging, and constructive feedback (may be too long or too brief)  COMPLETE: Provides substantive, encouraging, and constructive feedback in 75 to 100 words
0 points 5 points 15 points 20 points
Peer Reply 1: Timeliness  Late  On time
0 points 5 points
Frequent Low-Stakes, Automatically-Graded Quizzes

What is it

Frequent, low-stakes tests are assessments that have little impact on the student’s final grade. Use low-stakes tests to reinforce learning, instead of using them to assess student knowledge or to make sure your students have read the assigned material. For each class module, set up low-stakes quizzes that can be taken by the students as many times as they like, with only the highest grade being kept. Encourage students to take the quiz twice, at a minimum. First, the student should take the quiz once before reviewing the module content; this will establish a baseline of the student’s knowledge and will guide him towards the module content. Then, the student should take the quiz a second time after having watched the pre-class video, explored the resources in the bundles, and attended class; this will show the student’s growth in the subject.

When structuring the quizzes in this way, the tool is used as a formative evaluation, not summative. These quizzes can be used to strengthen students’ knowledge of key class terms and concepts. They can also be used to measure the growth of student knowledge: the first attempt is used as a baseline of knowledge, while the following attempts show the growth after reviewing the subjects and/or attending class. Finally, these quizzes help ensure that, when everyone comes together in class, all participants share the same basic knowledge of the terminology, concepts, and theories on which we will work.

Why do it (Benefits)

Using descriptive and specific feedback may:

  • Improve the retention of information through retrieval practice
  • Help reduce the achievement gaps of those students who are less prepared for a class
  • Help reduce testing-anxiety
  • Contribute to recovery practice processes that facilitate metacognition, mainly self-monitoring of self-understanding and self-regulation of study decisions
  • Establish a «preview» of the important concepts of each module, helping students adequately orient their attention.
  • Help ensure the best use of class time

How to do it

Creating quizzes in your online classroom will vary depending on the Learning Management System that your institution uses (for example, Blackboard, Moodle, Google Classrooms, or Canvas). However, these are some general guidelines you can follow.

  1. Based on the information you will cover in a particular module, create questions that can be answered with factual answers such as multiple-choice, true or false, fill in the blank, or matching questions. Using these types of questions will allow you to set up an automatically-graded quiz.
  2. Create a quiz for each module.
  3. Add the questions to the quiz.
  4. Set up the quiz to have an unlimited number of attempts.
  5. Set up the quiz to keep only the highest grade.
  6. Decide if you want to present questions randomly or always in the same order, depending on your objectives.
  7. Add instructions to the quiz.
  8. Link the module’s quiz in each module’s page and in the quizzes page.
  9. Manually or automatically open the quiz with enough time for students to take it at least once before you meet to discuss the module’s topic in class.
  10. Manually or automatically close the quiz after the module’s class, giving students enough time to complete the quiz at least once again.

We recommend the following instructions as a model for your own quiz instructions:

You can re-take this quiz as many times as you like, only your highest score will be kept. We recommend you take this quiz several times:

  • At least once before you do anything else, take the quiz to register a baseline (what you know before exploring any of the resources in class).
  • At least once after you finish watching the module’s video and reviewing the resources in the bundle related to this module (to measure your growth with the information).
  • As many other times as you like in order to get the score you want (and to show you dominate the core definitions and concepts of the module).

Following is an example of a question used in a low-stakes quiz about Mind, Brain, Health and Education science.

1. Which of the following would be the best definition for Mind, Brain, Health and Education Science (MBHE science)? Select the best answer.

a) “The use of the intersection between the mind (psychology), brain (neuroscience), health (physical and mental well-being), and education to maximize each individual’s potential to learn and develop. ”

b) «Modern Brown-Harrison Education»

c) «The intersection between sociology, anthropology, neurology, and anatomy to solve problems of daily life.»

Logistics Discussion Board

What is it

The Logistics Discussion Board is meant to be a space where students can ask questions about course logistics in a space that is visible to all.

Create a discussion board where students can ask questions about class logistics such as finding links, due dates, using the platform, quiz functionality, and others. Be sure to answer student questions promptly. Encourage students to ask questions via the discussion board, so that all may benefit from the answer (if one student has a question, there are probably more students with the same question). Also encourage students to help each other and respond to their peers if they know the answer.

Why do it (Benefits)

  • Using Logistic Discussion Boards may:
  • Help you build a stronger learning community between peers.
  • Help you create an environment of openness
  • Result in less time spent responding to individual emails from students with the same, or similar questions to others, ultimately improving your efficient use of time for the class.
  • Increase instructor presence and contact with students

How to do it

Creating a Discussion Board will vary depending on the Learning Management System that your institution uses (for example, Blackboard, Moodle, Google Classrooms, or Canvas). However, these are some general guidelines you can follow.

  1. Create a regular Discussion Board in the Learning Management System that you are using with your institution.
  2. Set up the opening date before the class begins.
  3. Do not include a closing or due date.
  4. If you will have this discussion board on the same page as other discussion boards, we recommend “pinning” it to the top of the page so that it is always easily accessible.
  5. If you can, create a separate page in your online classroom where you can have only the question-related discussion boards like this one and the Content Questions Discussion Board
  6. If possible, include information about the Logistics Discussion Board in your syllabus.
  7. Mention the Logistics Board to students on the first day of class and encourage them to ask all logistics questions in this space, and to look for answers there. Tell them that, although this is a space where they can ask most questions, they should feel free to contact you privately.
  8. In some systems, you can set up this Discussion Board to have a forced subscription for all learners. We recommend enabling this option so everyone is involved in the Discussion Board.
  9. Subscribe to the discussion board so that you get notifications when students post a question.

We recommend using the following prompt as a model for your own Logistics Discussion Board:

If you have questions about any aspect of the course logistics (e.g., finding links, using the website, quiz functionality, due dates), post them here (if you have the question, others are likely to have it as well!). While the teaching staff will check in on these regularly and reply here so others can benefit from the answers, students are also encouraged to post a reply. If you know the answer, share it!

To encourage students to look for answers in the Logistics Discussion Board you might consider using one or more of the following strategies:

  1. As part of their homework assignments during the first day or week of class, ask them to review the syllabus and explore the online classroom, and post at least one question about the syllabus or class logistics in the discussion board or bring a question to class. Even if most students do not have questions or do not post anything, you are encouraging your students to think of the discussion board as a classroom tool.
  2. If students ask you a question in class, answer it in class and then post the question and answer in the discussion board yourself. Aside from modeling the desired behavior for your students, this has the additional benefit that the question is answered for all students, even if they were not present (or were not paying attention) in class.
  3. If a student sends you an email with a question that you think is better answered in the discussion board (or you know has already been answered there), respond to the email with your own adaptation of the following statement. Be sure to include the link to the Logistics Discussion Board to guide your student:

“Dear John, 

That is a very good question. Have you looked at the Logistics Discussion Board for the answer? If this has not been asked before, please post your question there so that others may benefit from my answer (remember, if you have this question, others probably have the same question!). 

Best Regards, 

Anne

Module Page

What is it

Your online classroom can be organized using Module Pages for each main class topic. Each page can include more details about the topic such as key concepts and ideas that you want to highlight for your students. The module page should also guide students as to what they will need to complete for each module such as assignments, readings, and project submissions. Ideally, and especially if you are using a flipped classroom model, you should guide students through the activities they need to complete before class, during class, and after class.

Why do it (Benefits)

Using module pages for each main class topic may:

  • Make your online classroom more user-friendly
  • Help create a supportive environment for students
  • Guide students in the independent work they need to complete, ultimately leading to a decrease in the need for teacher’s follow up and support.

How to do it

Creating a separate page in your online classroom for each topic will vary depending on the Learning Management System that your institution uses (for example, Blackboard, Moodle, Google Classrooms, or Canvas). However, these are some general guidelines you can follow.

  1. Divide your class into topics and create a new page or tab for each topic.
  2. Plan the assignments that students will need to complete before class, during class, and after class for each module.
  3. Create a new page for each module.
  4. Add the module title at the beginning of each module page.
  5. Add information about the key ideas and concepts for the module in each module page.
  6. Include a link to the course calendar at the beginning of the module page.
  7. Indicate, in detail, what students need to do (1) before class, (2) during class, (3) after class.
  8. Be sure to include all relevant links to assignments, readings, videos, and others.
  9. Provide a link to the next module at the end of the page.
  10. Be sure to indicate any notes at the end of the module page. For example, if they can take a Quiz more than once, you can indicate this at the end of the module page.
  11. Decide if you want to include icons or other elements to make the page more visually appealing, or keep only text. Add icons if you wish.

We recommend the following general format for your individual module pages.

Module 1: What is Mind, Brain, and Education Science?

Key Ideas

Thinking through the transdisciplinary lens of Mind (psychology), Brain (neuroscience), and Education (pedagogy) is more efficient than thinking through the single lens of education.

Key Concepts

  • Transdisciplinary thinking
  • History of Mind, Brain, Health and Education science

Step 1: Prepare for Class

Review the calendar to assure you know key deadlines.

BEFORE class, complete the following activities:

1. Take Quiz 1.

2. Watch the pre-class video BEFORE attending the live class:

3. If you like, also have a look at the PowerPoint on The Differences Between Mind, Brain, and Education Science, Educational Neuroscience and the Learning Sciences

4. Skim the contents of the bundle on the Mind, Brain, and Education. Then read or watch at least ONE of the resources before coming to the live class.

5. Respond to the Discussion Board for Module 1.

OPTIONAL: If you have any questions, please upload them to the following open Discussion Boards so we can be sure to answer them before (or during) the live class. Remember, if you have a question, it is likely that others are wondering the same thing!

    • Upload your questions about Course Content here.
    • Upload your questions about Course Logistics here.

Step 2: Attend Class

1. Join us in the live class via Zoom (Meeting ID: 123 456 789) on Monday, September 12, 2020, from 3:00 pm to 5:00 pm EST.

2. Complete the 3-2-1 (Module 1) during the last five minutes of class or immediately after. This serves to document your learning as well as to register class participation and attendance (late submissions indicate asynchronous attendance to class).

Step 3: Follow-up from Class

1. Review the PowerPoint slides / live class recording and the Chat transcript of the synchronous class as many times as you like!

2. Respond to the Anonymous Survey for Module 1.

3. Reply to at least TWO other learners in class about their postings on the Discussion Board for Module 1.

4. If you like, take Quiz 1* again.

5. Prepare for Module 2.

*QUIZ: Take the quiz as many times as you like to deepen your knowledge of the key terms and concepts for this week. At a minimum, you should take the quiz before the live class in order to register a base-line level of knowledge, and then again after you have explored the bundles and attended the live class to measure your growth with the subject. Take the quiz as many times as you like (and get a perfect score!). Only your highest score will be registered.

Recommendations Discussion Board

What is it

The Recommendations Discussion Board is an area where your students can share recommended articles, websites, videos, podcasts, events, and others with each other. Encourage students to post recommendations to others in this area, and post recommendations yourself, to model and promote the behavior you expect to see.

Why do it (Benefits)

Using a Recommendations Discussion Boards may:

  • Help you build a stronger learning community between peers.
  • Help you create an environment of openness
  • Help build a cohesive and supportive learning community
  • Promote feelings of closeness with peers
  • Personalize learning.

How to do it

Creating a Discussion Board will vary depending on the Learning Management System that your institution uses (for example, Blackboard, Moodle, Google Classrooms, or Canvas). However, these are some general guidelines you can follow.

  1. Create a regular Discussion Board in the Learning Management System that you are using with your institution.
  2. While we recommend keeping this space as an ungraded assignment, you can decide if you want this to be a graded or ungraded assignment, depending on your objectives.
  3. “Get the ball rolling” by posting a few recommendations in the discussion board yourself, modeling how you would like your students to post.
  4. Encourage your students to post their own recommendations in the discussion board. For example, if you use 3-2-1 Reflections in your class, you can give your students feedback where you invite them to share the resources they find when they further investigate the “two things they will research further”.

We have recommended using the following prompt as a model for your own Recommendations Discussion Board:

This is your place to talk about and upload studies/resources that you feel your fellow students would find useful. Here you can post links to recommended articles, websites, videos, podcasts, events, and others. Include the title of the resource and, if possible, a short sentence indicating why you are recommending it.

Rubrics

What is it (What to do)
Why do it (Benefits)

Using descriptive and specific feedback may:

Three Before Me

What is it (What to do)
Why do it (Benefits)

Using descriptive and specific feedback may: